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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 4:58:35 PM   
kgdabom

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

quote:

ORIGINAL: McMurfy

I don’t think it’s just work ethic for Mitchell.
3 Head Coaches in 3 years.
The one that recruited him-Helfrich
The one that lies to everyone-Taggart
And the one he had the most success with-Cristobal


I will remain skeptical of Mitchell. He looks like the Onterrio Smith of this draft and I'm not suggesting he is the "S.O.D."
Even though I have a good feeling about Johnson at this point, I will have to say let's wait and see what happens. They have to prove it on the field.

What makes him look like the Onterrio Smith of this draft. Them both coming from Oregon. A scout saying he doesn't have a great work ethic. I suggest watching him actually play and be skeptical or not based on that. This isn't a highlight reel even though it may look like it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJ58SitvdcM&t=5s Just film from one game against Stanford. Here's a counterpoint film from a game against Michigan State in which he struggled a bit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDxcm8QmHQ4&t=39s He still had a rather spectacular TD and 60 yards in this game. I'm invested in this guy because I have made some bold comments about him. Those comments come from watching him play. I see a very talented WR with speed and elusiveness and an instinctual feel for getting open. I am concerned that he may be a bit of a head case due to the Akili Smith Twitter war, but I don't think that is likely to get in the way of his playing football well.

< Message edited by kgdabom -- 5/6/2019 5:05:27 PM >


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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 5:02:21 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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The player awarded a training camp site by tryout was a cornerback. (Wharton) I'm sure he did well in his tryout, but also I'm wondering if the Vikings were wondering if they should have another cornerback. They only drafted one corner (Boyd) and none of the undrafted free agents signed earlier were cornerbacks . Perhaps they were also not overwhelmed by Boyds debut in the rookie mini camp. Just speculating. Maybe I'm all wrong.

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Post #: 3502
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 5:07:29 PM   
kgdabom

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

The player awarded a training camp site by tryout was a cornerback. (Wharton) I'm sure he did well in his tryout, but also I'm wondering if the Vikings were wondering if they should have another cornerback. They only drafted one corner (Boyd) and none of the undrafted free agents signed earlier were cornerbacks . Perhaps they were also not overwhelmed by Boyds debut in the rookie mini camp. Just speculating. Maybe I'm all wrong.

Bruce you seem to be looking for the negative angle on this and you could be right. I'm hoping that Boyd was sensational in rookie camp and they signed Wharton just based on his own merit.

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Post #: 3503
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 5:42:22 PM   
Pager


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

The player awarded a training camp site by tryout was a cornerback. (Wharton) I'm sure he did well in his tryout, but also I'm wondering if the Vikings were wondering if they should have another cornerback. They only drafted one corner (Boyd) and none of the undrafted free agents signed earlier were cornerbacks . Perhaps they were also not overwhelmed by Boyds debut in the rookie mini camp. Just speculating. Maybe I'm all wrong.



Vikes signed a AAF cornerback, Duke Thomas. Between Boyd, Thomas and our returning group (even with Hughes coming off injury and Hill's suspension) CB is not a position group I'm too worried about.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 6:08:04 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Pager

quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

The player awarded a training camp site by tryout was a cornerback. (Wharton) I'm sure he did well in his tryout, but also I'm wondering if the Vikings were wondering if they should have another cornerback. They only drafted one corner (Boyd) and none of the undrafted free agents signed earlier were cornerbacks . Perhaps they were also not overwhelmed by Boyds debut in the rookie mini camp. Just speculating. Maybe I'm all wrong.



Vikes signed a AAF cornerback, Duke Thomas. Between Boyd, Thomas and our returning group (even with Hughes coming off injury and Hill's suspension) CB is not a position group I'm too worried about.


I had forgotten about that. I think you're right.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/6/2019 6:09:20 PM   
Todd M

 

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There are no position groups to worry about. We're good. Everything's good...
Post #: 3506
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/7/2019 5:50:33 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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Some meat on a slow day.

https://www.vikings.com/video/garrett-bradbury-film-room

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Post #: 3507
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/7/2019 6:12:23 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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This probably was already posted. Not sure, but I watched for the first time, just now. Lot's of nervousness and emotion in the beginning.

https://www.vikings.com/video/garrett-bradbury-vikings-meet-the-pick-nfl-draft

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Post #: 3508
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 10:31:31 AM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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I see Samia has put on 15 pounds since last playing for the Sooners. Hopefully it's good weight. Ostensibly, he is lacking in "core strength", but I see he did 28 reps at the combine. I think the guy has been serious about getting ready for Pro football and we might have gotten ourselves a steal.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 12:16:14 PM   
kgdabom

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

I see Samia has put on 15 pounds since last playing for the Sooners. Hopefully it's good weight. Ostensibly, he is lacking in "core strength", but I see he did 28 reps at the combine. I think the guy has been serious about getting ready for Pro football and we might have gotten ourselves a steal.

Combine bench reps are very closely correlated with arm length. Bradury has T-Rex arm length 31.75 and put up 34 reps. Samia has average arm length 33" and did 28 as you mentioned which is pretty good. Some of these guys with Pterodactyl wing spans 35 inch arms have trouble putting up 20 reps despite being very strong.

< Message edited by kgdabom -- 5/9/2019 12:18:56 PM >


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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 12:29:46 PM   
TJSweens


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Key to Vikings rookie Dru Samia’s success? ‘A million reasons to be mad’

By DANE MIZUTANI | dmizutani@pioneerpress.com | Pioneer Press
PUBLISHED: May 8, 2019 at 12:51 pm | UPDATED: May 8, 2019 at 4:22 pm

Within a few seconds of watching Vikings rookie offensive guard Dru Samia compete, it’s easy to tell he has a mean streak to rival some of the baddest dudes in the NFL. “Maybe one of the toughest competitors we’ve seen on tape with how he finishes,” general manager Rick Spielman said of the 6-foot-5, 310-pound offensive lineman. “He has a few technical flaws to clean up. We think that is correctable with coaching.”

Drafted in the fourth round of the NFL Draft on April 26, Samia said a mean streak is a prerequisite for an offensive line at any level.

Where does his come from?

“Well, I have like a million reasons to be mad at any given moment, so I just pick one of them,” Samia said. “You definitely need to be mad because (linemen) are the ones that make contact every single play.”

Pressed for what makes him angry, Samia demurred.

“You guys don’t get to know that,” he said. “That’s my little secret.”

It has worked wonders so far. Samia started four seasons at Oklahoma and was named a second-team All-American last season after blocking for the No. 1 overall pick, quarterback Kyler Murray.

“He fits the zone scheme very well,” Spielman said of Samia. “He was the highest-rated player on our board at the time, and we were going to stay true to our board, and continue to add to that competition on the offensive line.”

Competition should be fierce, particularly among guards on the current roster. Aside from Samia, the Vikings brought in veteran Josh Kline, as well as journeyman Dakota Dozier, this offseason.

“I want to be able to contribute to the team as fast as possible,” Samia said. “If that means starts right away, then awesome. If that means being the best teammate and best supporting guy that I can, then that’s what I’m going to do.”

Make no mistake, though, Samia intends on starting at some point this season.

“I am an athletic offensive lineman,” he said while acknowledging that his 5.29-second 40-yard dash time might suggest otherwise. “I think my athleticism and my ability to move in space definitely helps out in this zone scheme.”

Athletic ability was not Samia’s major concern coming out of college; he mostly wanted to work on his size and strength, and has added nearly 15 pounds over the past few months.

“It still looks good though, right?” Samia said with a smile. “I wanted to show them that I’ve been hitting the weight room and getting a little bit bigger for this game.”

It paid off for Samia in the early stages of rookie camp last week; head coach Mike Zimmer noticed his weight gain right away.

“He looked huge to me today,” Zimmer said. “Just looks bigger than he did on tape. You get some of those kind of things sometimes.”

How big does Samia want to get?

“Honestly, I think 310 pounds is feeling good right now,” he said. “As far as I can push it without feeling fat, I’ll definitely be doing that.”
And staying mad every step of the way.



Personally, I think a mean streak is a great quality in an O-lineman.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 12:37:36 PM   
Pager


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Love it. In addition to vastly improved skill, Bradbury and Samia are nasty and play through the whistle. Should be infectious.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 1:24:28 PM   
Phil Riewer


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Pager

Love it. In addition to vastly improved skill, Bradbury and Samia are nasty and play through the whistle. Should be infectious.


Maybe by scouting Ford they ran across Samia?

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 3:35:47 PM   
kgdabom

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Phil Riewer

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pager

Love it. In addition to vastly improved skill, Bradbury and Samia are nasty and play through the whistle. Should be infectious.


Maybe by scouting Ford they ran across Samia?

Samia was a second team all American and first team big 12. Might have even won/shared the Big 12 Lineman of the year award. I'm pretty sure we were scouting him regardless of Ford.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 6:19:23 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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Bleacherreport gave the Vikings a C- for their un-drafted free agents. They noted the Washington QB and also the Vanderbilt RB who is pretty big. (230 lbs)
I was thinking that Vikings have a lot of draft picks. After the fourth round I believe only a very few will crack the 53 man roster. To get from 90 to 53 means a lot of cuts. I suppose a few could make the team if they are impactful on special teams. The USC LB is a good candidate for that.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 8:42:07 PM   
kurt bilben


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Bruce Johnson

Bleacherreport gave the Vikings a C- for their un-drafted free agents. They noted the Washington QB and also the Vanderbilt RB who is pretty big. (230 lbs)
I was thinking that Vikings have a lot of draft picks. After the fourth round I believe only a very few will crack the 53 man roster. To get from 90 to 53 means a lot of cuts. I suppose a few could make the team if they are impactful on special teams. The USC LB is a good candidate for that.



Although immediate draft grades are incredibly ridiculous on it’s face, having real time “un-drafted free agent” grades is hysterical...
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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 8:42:49 PM   
kurt bilben


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I know, slow time of the year.... so I get it.
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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/9/2019 9:30:28 PM   
bohumm

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

Key to Vikings rookie Dru Samia’s success? ‘A million reasons to be mad’

By DANE MIZUTANI | dmizutani@pioneerpress.com | Pioneer Press
PUBLISHED: May 8, 2019 at 12:51 pm | UPDATED: May 8, 2019 at 4:22 pm




Personally, I think a mean streak is a great quality in an O-lineman.

Thanks for posting this.
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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/10/2019 10:46:15 AM   
TJSweens


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Mobile mountain: Immense Vikings draft pick Oli Udoh tries to make big leap from to the NFL

Oli Udoh's commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.
By Andrew Krammer Star Tribune

MAY 10, 2019 — 8:34AM

Oli Udoh lost more than 50 pounds to play for Elon University. Yet this spring, the gargantuan tackle sat in front of NFL teams during draft interviews and listened to questions about his commitment to football.

Those teams found out a lot of interesting things about Udoh, who was taken in the sixth round (193rd overall) by the Vikings on April 27.
An honor roll son of a doctor and a nurse, the 6-5, 325-pounder also has visions of a medical career. So Benjamin and Rita Udoh, owners of a medical practice in Fayetteville, N.C., and Nigerian immigrants, “took a little bit of time” to warm up to the idea of the second of their four children choosing the path of modern-day gladiator.

“We were very wary, because of the injury risk associated with football,” Rita Udoh said. “But I came on board when I knew exactly it was something he loved doing.”
Udoh’s commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.

“I knew, and have always known, Oli was strong,” Benjamin Udoh said.
Oli’s growth spurts first ate into the Udoh family budget when the week’s worth of groceries lasted only three days. As a youngster, playing hide-and-seek was futile, he says, because he had no chance fitting under a bed. The family car eventually became a spacious Chevy Suburban, out of necessity.

“We had no choice,” Rita Udoh said.
But eventually those tree-trunk limbs and fluid movements caught the attention of NFL personnel, such as Vikings offensive line coach/run game coordinator Rick Dennison, who lobbied his bosses to take a late-round swing on a player who is a project. The Vikings were sold after Udoh held up against tougher competition at college all-star games. Udoh bonded with assistant offensive line coach Andrew Janocko, who served as coordinator in the East-West Shrine Game.

“He’s got great size and is a really, really good athlete,” Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. “We figured he would be a guy that has a lot of upside to work with.”
You don’t often see 325 pounds move quickly, which is why General Manager Rick Spielman noted Udoh’s 40-yard dash time (5.05 seconds) moments after drafting him. Only five offensive linemen bested his straight-line speed at the scouting combine, and the heaviest of those five was 10 pounds lighter than Udoh.

Spielman could have pointed to another rarity, Udoh’s arm length (35⅜ inches). Udoh’s 7-foot-plus wingspan was the longest among 47 offensive linemen benching at the combine. Despite those long arms, however, he still ranked 16th with 26 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press.
Udoh’s full first name — Olisaemeka — means “God is good” in a Nigerian dialect. But how good will a lineman of his unique size and skill set be in the NFL? Travis Martz, Udoh’s agent, remains confident of his client’s eventual success.

“God just doesn’t make many of these players,” he said.

Discovering a game that suits him

Football wasn’t always the grand plan, it was only a game Udoh first saw on television in middle school. The showcase of strength and bursts of activity attracted him, instead of the constant action on the basketball court where he was recruited to a grade-school practice. Sprints ended the hoops experiment, even if he could dunk without a running start.
He preferred a game where fouls don’t come so easily.

“Just loved it,” said Udoh, who first played football as a sophomore at Fayetteville’s Sanford High School.

Other loves, such as junk food, were put aside when he stepped onto the scale at 384 pounds as an Elon freshman. He then failed a conditioning test.
After a redshirt year and a new diet led to the 50-pound loss, Udoh started 45 consecutive games. Tony Trisciani, Elon’s head coach and former defensive coordinator, first envisioned an NFL future for Udoh when he frustrated Elon’s star pass rushers with those long limbs.

“When you have that kind of length and strength — that’s what NFL guys look like,” Trisciani said. “It didn’t take long to figure out he was a guy that would have a chance.”
NFL teams questioned if Udoh possessed a “nasty” streak, which didn’t show through finished blocks until his senior year. He is soft-spoken in interviews. His own agent left their first meeting impressed but clueless whether Udoh would sign with the agency because of his quiet nature.

Trisciani, however, watched Udoh learn to tap into a below-the-surface combativeness on the field.
“You don’t want to mistake kindness for weakness with Oli,” Trisciani said.

Family support, confusion

So Elon, and its 11,250-seat Rhodes Stadium, made an appropriate learning environment for the Udoh family, which immigrated from Nigeria in the 1980s and 1990s. Rita Udoh embraced football by leading autumn caravans on the 90-mile drive northwest from Fayetteville to watch Oli’s home games.
Cheers are always there, even if timing is a work in progress.
“I’m making noise when I’m not supposed to,” Rita Udoh said. “I’m watching and thinking, ‘Oh, we tackled them,’ and it’s, ‘No, no, they tackled us.’ I’m still a very confused fan, but the main thing is we support him.”

Support will remain if Udoh eventually practices medicine, the family business. “When it’s all said and done,” he said, he’d like to have a career in orthopedic or internal medicine.
It runs in the Udoh family.

Udoh’s older brother, Chiagozie, is a former basketball player working to be a dentist. His younger sister, Una, plays basketball at Wake Forest and wants to be a pediatrician. The youngest, Ezemdi, is challenging Oli’s title for top family athlete as a high school junior, already possessing Division I football offers from Tennessee and Virginia.
Udoh said he still owns his clan’s bragging rights “for now.”
“[Ezemdi] has got the offers and is a pretty athletic kid,” Udoh said. “So we’ll see how long it lasts.”


_____________________________

Baseball must be a wonderful game to survive the fools who run it.
Post #: 3519
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/10/2019 12:12:26 PM   
Tom Sykes


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

Mobile mountain: Immense Vikings draft pick Oli Udoh tries to make big leap from to the NFL

Oli Udoh's commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.
By Andrew Krammer Star Tribune

MAY 10, 2019 — 8:34AM

Oli Udoh lost more than 50 pounds to play for Elon University. Yet this spring, the gargantuan tackle sat in front of NFL teams during draft interviews and listened to questions about his commitment to football.

Those teams found out a lot of interesting things about Udoh, who was taken in the sixth round (193rd overall) by the Vikings on April 27.
An honor roll son of a doctor and a nurse, the 6-5, 325-pounder also has visions of a medical career. So Benjamin and Rita Udoh, owners of a medical practice in Fayetteville, N.C., and Nigerian immigrants, “took a little bit of time” to warm up to the idea of the second of their four children choosing the path of modern-day gladiator.

“We were very wary, because of the injury risk associated with football,” Rita Udoh said. “But I came on board when I knew exactly it was something he loved doing.”
Udoh’s commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.

“I knew, and have always known, Oli was strong,” Benjamin Udoh said.
Oli’s growth spurts first ate into the Udoh family budget when the week’s worth of groceries lasted only three days. As a youngster, playing hide-and-seek was futile, he says, because he had no chance fitting under a bed. The family car eventually became a spacious Chevy Suburban, out of necessity.

“We had no choice,” Rita Udoh said.
But eventually those tree-trunk limbs and fluid movements caught the attention of NFL personnel, such as Vikings offensive line coach/run game coordinator Rick Dennison, who lobbied his bosses to take a late-round swing on a player who is a project. The Vikings were sold after Udoh held up against tougher competition at college all-star games. Udoh bonded with assistant offensive line coach Andrew Janocko, who served as coordinator in the East-West Shrine Game.

“He’s got great size and is a really, really good athlete,” Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. “We figured he would be a guy that has a lot of upside to work with.”
You don’t often see 325 pounds move quickly, which is why General Manager Rick Spielman noted Udoh’s 40-yard dash time (5.05 seconds) moments after drafting him. Only five offensive linemen bested his straight-line speed at the scouting combine, and the heaviest of those five was 10 pounds lighter than Udoh.

Spielman could have pointed to another rarity, Udoh’s arm length (35⅜ inches). Udoh’s 7-foot-plus wingspan was the longest among 47 offensive linemen benching at the combine. Despite those long arms, however, he still ranked 16th with 26 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press.
Udoh’s full first name — Olisaemeka — means “God is good” in a Nigerian dialect. But how good will a lineman of his unique size and skill set be in the NFL? Travis Martz, Udoh’s agent, remains confident of his client’s eventual success.

“God just doesn’t make many of these players,” he said.

Discovering a game that suits him

Football wasn’t always the grand plan, it was only a game Udoh first saw on television in middle school. The showcase of strength and bursts of activity attracted him, instead of the constant action on the basketball court where he was recruited to a grade-school practice. Sprints ended the hoops experiment, even if he could dunk without a running start.
He preferred a game where fouls don’t come so easily.

“Just loved it,” said Udoh, who first played football as a sophomore at Fayetteville’s Sanford High School.

Other loves, such as junk food, were put aside when he stepped onto the scale at 384 pounds as an Elon freshman. He then failed a conditioning test.
After a redshirt year and a new diet led to the 50-pound loss, Udoh started 45 consecutive games. Tony Trisciani, Elon’s head coach and former defensive coordinator, first envisioned an NFL future for Udoh when he frustrated Elon’s star pass rushers with those long limbs.

“When you have that kind of length and strength — that’s what NFL guys look like,” Trisciani said. “It didn’t take long to figure out he was a guy that would have a chance.”
NFL teams questioned if Udoh possessed a “nasty” streak, which didn’t show through finished blocks until his senior year. He is soft-spoken in interviews. His own agent left their first meeting impressed but clueless whether Udoh would sign with the agency because of his quiet nature.

Trisciani, however, watched Udoh learn to tap into a below-the-surface combativeness on the field.
“You don’t want to mistake kindness for weakness with Oli,” Trisciani said.

Family support, confusion

So Elon, and its 11,250-seat Rhodes Stadium, made an appropriate learning environment for the Udoh family, which immigrated from Nigeria in the 1980s and 1990s. Rita Udoh embraced football by leading autumn caravans on the 90-mile drive northwest from Fayetteville to watch Oli’s home games.
Cheers are always there, even if timing is a work in progress.
“I’m making noise when I’m not supposed to,” Rita Udoh said. “I’m watching and thinking, ‘Oh, we tackled them,’ and it’s, ‘No, no, they tackled us.’ I’m still a very confused fan, but the main thing is we support him.”

Support will remain if Udoh eventually practices medicine, the family business. “When it’s all said and done,” he said, he’d like to have a career in orthopedic or internal medicine.
It runs in the Udoh family.

Udoh’s older brother, Chiagozie, is a former basketball player working to be a dentist. His younger sister, Una, plays basketball at Wake Forest and wants to be a pediatrician. The youngest, Ezemdi, is challenging Oli’s title for top family athlete as a high school junior, already possessing Division I football offers from Tennessee and Virginia.
Udoh said he still owns his clan’s bragging rights “for now.”
“[Ezemdi] has got the offers and is a pretty athletic kid,” Udoh said. “So we’ll see how long it lasts.”


I'm intrigued.

Oli Udoh ('DOH!' for short)

Manchild behemoth with tree trunk legs and tree limb arms. Strong, fast, academically smart but too nice.

We'll need Samia to slap him around in the huddle (Jeff Christy-like) to stop saying 'sorry' after obliterating Dlineman.
Post #: 3520
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/10/2019 12:39:15 PM   
kgdabom

 

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To me Udoh looks very clumsy even in his highlight tapes. He needs to get his movement/footwork refined a lot before he could block NFL level defenders successfully. Hopefully he can be coached up because there is certainly great potential.

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So let it be done."
Post #: 3521
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/10/2019 2:37:54 PM   
Bruce Johnson

 

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If he makes the 53 man team it may be because there has not been enough progress by our other backups. Anyway, hard to speculate now. I was saying yesterday I thought quite a few of the draft choices after the fourth round will not make the 53 ma roster in September.

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RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/10/2019 8:03:08 PM   
Murph


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Tom Sykes

quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

Mobile mountain: Immense Vikings draft pick Oli Udoh tries to make big leap from to the NFL

Oli Udoh's commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.
By Andrew Krammer Star Tribune

MAY 10, 2019 — 8:34AM

Oli Udoh lost more than 50 pounds to play for Elon University. Yet this spring, the gargantuan tackle sat in front of NFL teams during draft interviews and listened to questions about his commitment to football.

Those teams found out a lot of interesting things about Udoh, who was taken in the sixth round (193rd overall) by the Vikings on April 27.
An honor roll son of a doctor and a nurse, the 6-5, 325-pounder also has visions of a medical career. So Benjamin and Rita Udoh, owners of a medical practice in Fayetteville, N.C., and Nigerian immigrants, “took a little bit of time” to warm up to the idea of the second of their four children choosing the path of modern-day gladiator.

“We were very wary, because of the injury risk associated with football,” Rita Udoh said. “But I came on board when I knew exactly it was something he loved doing.”
Udoh’s commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.

“I knew, and have always known, Oli was strong,” Benjamin Udoh said.
Oli’s growth spurts first ate into the Udoh family budget when the week’s worth of groceries lasted only three days. As a youngster, playing hide-and-seek was futile, he says, because he had no chance fitting under a bed. The family car eventually became a spacious Chevy Suburban, out of necessity.

“We had no choice,” Rita Udoh said.
But eventually those tree-trunk limbs and fluid movements caught the attention of NFL personnel, such as Vikings offensive line coach/run game coordinator Rick Dennison, who lobbied his bosses to take a late-round swing on a player who is a project. The Vikings were sold after Udoh held up against tougher competition at college all-star games. Udoh bonded with assistant offensive line coach Andrew Janocko, who served as coordinator in the East-West Shrine Game.

“He’s got great size and is a really, really good athlete,” Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. “We figured he would be a guy that has a lot of upside to work with.”
You don’t often see 325 pounds move quickly, which is why General Manager Rick Spielman noted Udoh’s 40-yard dash time (5.05 seconds) moments after drafting him. Only five offensive linemen bested his straight-line speed at the scouting combine, and the heaviest of those five was 10 pounds lighter than Udoh.

Spielman could have pointed to another rarity, Udoh’s arm length (35⅜ inches). Udoh’s 7-foot-plus wingspan was the longest among 47 offensive linemen benching at the combine. Despite those long arms, however, he still ranked 16th with 26 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press.
Udoh’s full first name — Olisaemeka — means “God is good” in a Nigerian dialect. But how good will a lineman of his unique size and skill set be in the NFL? Travis Martz, Udoh’s agent, remains confident of his client’s eventual success.

“God just doesn’t make many of these players,” he said.

Discovering a game that suits him

Football wasn’t always the grand plan, it was only a game Udoh first saw on television in middle school. The showcase of strength and bursts of activity attracted him, instead of the constant action on the basketball court where he was recruited to a grade-school practice. Sprints ended the hoops experiment, even if he could dunk without a running start.
He preferred a game where fouls don’t come so easily.

“Just loved it,” said Udoh, who first played football as a sophomore at Fayetteville’s Sanford High School.

Other loves, such as junk food, were put aside when he stepped onto the scale at 384 pounds as an Elon freshman. He then failed a conditioning test.
After a redshirt year and a new diet led to the 50-pound loss, Udoh started 45 consecutive games. Tony Trisciani, Elon’s head coach and former defensive coordinator, first envisioned an NFL future for Udoh when he frustrated Elon’s star pass rushers with those long limbs.

“When you have that kind of length and strength — that’s what NFL guys look like,” Trisciani said. “It didn’t take long to figure out he was a guy that would have a chance.”
NFL teams questioned if Udoh possessed a “nasty” streak, which didn’t show through finished blocks until his senior year. He is soft-spoken in interviews. His own agent left their first meeting impressed but clueless whether Udoh would sign with the agency because of his quiet nature.

Trisciani, however, watched Udoh learn to tap into a below-the-surface combativeness on the field.
“You don’t want to mistake kindness for weakness with Oli,” Trisciani said.

Family support, confusion

So Elon, and its 11,250-seat Rhodes Stadium, made an appropriate learning environment for the Udoh family, which immigrated from Nigeria in the 1980s and 1990s. Rita Udoh embraced football by leading autumn caravans on the 90-mile drive northwest from Fayetteville to watch Oli’s home games.
Cheers are always there, even if timing is a work in progress.
“I’m making noise when I’m not supposed to,” Rita Udoh said. “I’m watching and thinking, ‘Oh, we tackled them,’ and it’s, ‘No, no, they tackled us.’ I’m still a very confused fan, but the main thing is we support him.”

Support will remain if Udoh eventually practices medicine, the family business. “When it’s all said and done,” he said, he’d like to have a career in orthopedic or internal medicine.
It runs in the Udoh family.

Udoh’s older brother, Chiagozie, is a former basketball player working to be a dentist. His younger sister, Una, plays basketball at Wake Forest and wants to be a pediatrician. The youngest, Ezemdi, is challenging Oli’s title for top family athlete as a high school junior, already possessing Division I football offers from Tennessee and Virginia.
Udoh said he still owns his clan’s bragging rights “for now.”
“[Ezemdi] has got the offers and is a pretty athletic kid,” Udoh said. “So we’ll see how long it lasts.”


I'm intrigued.

Oli Udoh ('DOH!' for short)

Manchild behemoth with tree trunk legs and tree limb arms. Strong, fast, academically smart but too nice.

We'll need Samia to slap him around in the huddle (Jeff Christy-like) to stop saying 'sorry' after obliterating Dlineman.



Is Richie Incognito still available?

_____________________________

Purple Dynasty!
Post #: 3523
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/11/2019 6:45:37 AM   
thebigo


Posts: 25397
Joined: 7/14/2007
Status: online
quote:

ORIGINAL: Murph

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tom Sykes

quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

Mobile mountain: Immense Vikings draft pick Oli Udoh tries to make big leap from to the NFL

Oli Udoh's commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.
By Andrew Krammer Star Tribune

MAY 10, 2019 — 8:34AM

Oli Udoh lost more than 50 pounds to play for Elon University. Yet this spring, the gargantuan tackle sat in front of NFL teams during draft interviews and listened to questions about his commitment to football.

Those teams found out a lot of interesting things about Udoh, who was taken in the sixth round (193rd overall) by the Vikings on April 27.
An honor roll son of a doctor and a nurse, the 6-5, 325-pounder also has visions of a medical career. So Benjamin and Rita Udoh, owners of a medical practice in Fayetteville, N.C., and Nigerian immigrants, “took a little bit of time” to warm up to the idea of the second of their four children choosing the path of modern-day gladiator.

“We were very wary, because of the injury risk associated with football,” Rita Udoh said. “But I came on board when I knew exactly it was something he loved doing.”
Udoh’s commitment to football helped him overcome the odds of making it to the NFL — and so did his size.

“I knew, and have always known, Oli was strong,” Benjamin Udoh said.
Oli’s growth spurts first ate into the Udoh family budget when the week’s worth of groceries lasted only three days. As a youngster, playing hide-and-seek was futile, he says, because he had no chance fitting under a bed. The family car eventually became a spacious Chevy Suburban, out of necessity.

“We had no choice,” Rita Udoh said.
But eventually those tree-trunk limbs and fluid movements caught the attention of NFL personnel, such as Vikings offensive line coach/run game coordinator Rick Dennison, who lobbied his bosses to take a late-round swing on a player who is a project. The Vikings were sold after Udoh held up against tougher competition at college all-star games. Udoh bonded with assistant offensive line coach Andrew Janocko, who served as coordinator in the East-West Shrine Game.

“He’s got great size and is a really, really good athlete,” Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. “We figured he would be a guy that has a lot of upside to work with.”
You don’t often see 325 pounds move quickly, which is why General Manager Rick Spielman noted Udoh’s 40-yard dash time (5.05 seconds) moments after drafting him. Only five offensive linemen bested his straight-line speed at the scouting combine, and the heaviest of those five was 10 pounds lighter than Udoh.

Spielman could have pointed to another rarity, Udoh’s arm length (35⅜ inches). Udoh’s 7-foot-plus wingspan was the longest among 47 offensive linemen benching at the combine. Despite those long arms, however, he still ranked 16th with 26 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press.
Udoh’s full first name — Olisaemeka — means “God is good” in a Nigerian dialect. But how good will a lineman of his unique size and skill set be in the NFL? Travis Martz, Udoh’s agent, remains confident of his client’s eventual success.

“God just doesn’t make many of these players,” he said.

Discovering a game that suits him

Football wasn’t always the grand plan, it was only a game Udoh first saw on television in middle school. The showcase of strength and bursts of activity attracted him, instead of the constant action on the basketball court where he was recruited to a grade-school practice. Sprints ended the hoops experiment, even if he could dunk without a running start.
He preferred a game where fouls don’t come so easily.

“Just loved it,” said Udoh, who first played football as a sophomore at Fayetteville’s Sanford High School.

Other loves, such as junk food, were put aside when he stepped onto the scale at 384 pounds as an Elon freshman. He then failed a conditioning test.
After a redshirt year and a new diet led to the 50-pound loss, Udoh started 45 consecutive games. Tony Trisciani, Elon’s head coach and former defensive coordinator, first envisioned an NFL future for Udoh when he frustrated Elon’s star pass rushers with those long limbs.

“When you have that kind of length and strength — that’s what NFL guys look like,” Trisciani said. “It didn’t take long to figure out he was a guy that would have a chance.”
NFL teams questioned if Udoh possessed a “nasty” streak, which didn’t show through finished blocks until his senior year. He is soft-spoken in interviews. His own agent left their first meeting impressed but clueless whether Udoh would sign with the agency because of his quiet nature.

Trisciani, however, watched Udoh learn to tap into a below-the-surface combativeness on the field.
“You don’t want to mistake kindness for weakness with Oli,” Trisciani said.

Family support, confusion

So Elon, and its 11,250-seat Rhodes Stadium, made an appropriate learning environment for the Udoh family, which immigrated from Nigeria in the 1980s and 1990s. Rita Udoh embraced football by leading autumn caravans on the 90-mile drive northwest from Fayetteville to watch Oli’s home games.
Cheers are always there, even if timing is a work in progress.
“I’m making noise when I’m not supposed to,” Rita Udoh said. “I’m watching and thinking, ‘Oh, we tackled them,’ and it’s, ‘No, no, they tackled us.’ I’m still a very confused fan, but the main thing is we support him.”

Support will remain if Udoh eventually practices medicine, the family business. “When it’s all said and done,” he said, he’d like to have a career in orthopedic or internal medicine.
It runs in the Udoh family.

Udoh’s older brother, Chiagozie, is a former basketball player working to be a dentist. His younger sister, Una, plays basketball at Wake Forest and wants to be a pediatrician. The youngest, Ezemdi, is challenging Oli’s title for top family athlete as a high school junior, already possessing Division I football offers from Tennessee and Virginia.
Udoh said he still owns his clan’s bragging rights “for now.”
“[Ezemdi] has got the offers and is a pretty athletic kid,” Udoh said. “So we’ll see how long it lasts.”


I'm intrigued.

Oli Udoh ('DOH!' for short)

Manchild behemoth with tree trunk legs and tree limb arms. Strong, fast, academically smart but too nice.

We'll need Samia to slap him around in the huddle (Jeff Christy-like) to stop saying 'sorry' after obliterating Dlineman.



Is Richie Incognito still available?


Good one!
Post #: 3524
RE: 2019 NFL Draft - 5/11/2019 7:30:44 AM   
Bill Jandro

 

Posts: 14368
Joined: 8/13/2007
Status: offline
Is Richie Incognito still available?

Heard Oakland brought him in for a work out

_____________________________

Oline...early and often this draft
Post #: 3525
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