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RE: Baseball Trivia

 
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RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/13/2008 9:45:51 PM   
TJSweens


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

A "HEADS-UP" PLAY

A batter's long fly ball bounces off the center-field fence, strikes the outfielder on the head, and bounces into the stands.  The umpire awards the batter a ground-rule double .  Is the ruling a good one?


Yes. The CF fence is a surface that is in play and since the ball struck it first it can't be a HR. The ball did carom out of play after meaning it would either have to be a ground rule double or the batter would get what ever base he was running to plus one more.

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Post #: 26
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 6:33:21 AM   
Adam Peterson


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

A "HEADS-UP" PLAY

A batter's long fly ball bounces off the center-field fence, strikes the outfielder on the head, and bounces into the stands.  The umpire awards the batter a ground-rule double .  Is the ruling a good one?


Yes. The CF fence is a surface that is in play and since the ball struck it first it can't be a HR. The ball did carom out of play after meaning it would either have to be a ground rule double or the batter would get what ever base he was running to plus one more.


But if the ball bounces directly off the top of the fence and goes out of the ballpark, it's a homerun. The key here is that it comes back and strikes the outfielder?

In other words,
- Ball bounces off the top of the fence and into the stands - HR
- Ball bounces off outfielder's head and into stands - HR
- Fence, then outfielder, into stands - Not a HR

Interesting...
Post #: 27
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 8:13:33 AM   
TJSweens


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Once the ball strikes the wall on its face it is no longer in flight. It is considered to be "bounding". That is the same reason that if the ball hits the wall and the CF catches it before it hits the ground the play is not ruled an out.

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"The eternal fate of the noble and enlightened: to be brutally crushed by the armed and dumb."
Post #: 28
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 8:35:39 AM   
Todd G


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ANSWER TO A "HEADS UP" PLAY

The umpire is right to rule a "bounding" fair ball that is deflected by a player into the stands in fair territory a double.  Once a fly ball hits the fence, it is considered a "bounding" ball, not a ball "in flight,"  and cannot be ruled a home run.  A ball "in flight" - that is, a fair fly ball deflected by a player into the stands in fair territory-is a home run.

The Expos' Andre Dawson, in a 1977 game at Montreal's Olympic Stadium, rocketed a long fly ball to center field that bounded off the wall, struck Dodger outfielder Rick Monday on the head, and bounced into the stands.  Dawson got a double; Monday, a headache.  [NOTE:  not my joke]
Post #: 29
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 9:20:50 AM   
Trekgeekscott


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And who can forget the ball bouncing off of Jose Canseco's head into the stands for a home run?

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"All things can be understood once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." Gallileo Gallilei
Post #: 30
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 9:23:34 AM   
TJSweens


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Trekgeekscott

And who can forget the ball bouncing off of Jose Canseco's head into the stands for a home run?


One of my single favorite moments in about 40 years of watching baseball.

_____________________________

"The eternal fate of the noble and enlightened: to be brutally crushed by the armed and dumb."
Post #: 31
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 11:40:44 AM   
Mark Cummings


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

quote:

ORIGINAL: Trekgeekscott

And who can forget the ball bouncing off of Jose Canseco's head into the stands for a home run?


One of my single favorite moments in about 40 years of watching baseball.


You waited until you were 20 before you started watching baseball? 

_____________________________

Rooting for the Yankees is like going to a casino and cheering for the house. - Doug Stanhope
Post #: 32
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 12:01:20 PM   
TJSweens


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Mark Cummings

quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

quote:

ORIGINAL: Trekgeekscott

And who can forget the ball bouncing off of Jose Canseco's head into the stands for a home run?


One of my single favorite moments in about 40 years of watching baseball.


You waited until you were 20 before you started watching baseball? 




_____________________________

"The eternal fate of the noble and enlightened: to be brutally crushed by the armed and dumb."
Post #: 33
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 12:01:37 PM   
Guest
As per my earlier post regarding the ball hitting the head and then going out, the ball hitting the fence before the head was key.  Conseco's was ruled a homer and the one referred to by Todd was ruled a ground rule double.

But the reason I disagreed with the ump's ruling when I read Todd's post and then responded, I thought the ump had more discretion on a ball leaving the bark, i.e., bouncing over the wall if the bounce is "deliberate".  But in thinking about this, the ump has discretion in awarding a baserunner an extra base, correct.  If there was a runner on first and had rounded second when the ball hit the fence, the runner of first could be put to third or given home plate depending on the umpire's decision.  The ump doesn't have to send the runner to third but can award the runner home plate since second base was already achieved when the ball hit the fence.  But the ump must give the batter a ground rule double in that situation.

Is this correct? 
  Post #: 34
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 12:03:19 PM   
Guest
quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mark Cummings

quote:

ORIGINAL: TJSweens

quote:

ORIGINAL: Trekgeekscott

And who can forget the ball bouncing off of Jose Canseco's head into the stands for a home run?


One of my single favorite moments in about 40 years of watching baseball.


You waited until you were 20 before you started watching baseball? 





Tim, in Lewis' photo, I don't think he is using the middle finger to make a point.  Is it you or Lewis responding to Mark's post?
  Post #: 35
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 1:47:46 PM   
Todd G


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles K

As per my earlier post regarding the ball hitting the head and then going out, the ball hitting the fence before the head was key.  Conseco's was ruled a homer and the one referred to by Todd was ruled a ground rule double.

But the reason I disagreed with the ump's ruling when I read Todd's post and then responded, I thought the ump had more discretion on a ball leaving the bark, i.e., bouncing over the wall if the bounce is "deliberate".  But in thinking about this, the ump has discretion in awarding a baserunner an extra base, correct.  If there was a runner on first and had rounded second when the ball hit the fence, the runner of first could be put to third or given home plate depending on the umpire's decision.  The ump doesn't have to send the runner to third but can award the runner home plate since second base was already achieved when the ball hit the fence.  But the ump must give the batter a ground rule double in that situation.

Is this correct? 


Any player with the ability to direct a bounding ball out of the park off his head should.
1)  Be given the benefit of the doubt by the umpires on athletic ability alone.
2)  Benched by his manager for attempting such a "bone-headed" play.
Post #: 36
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 1:51:25 PM   
Todd G


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THE GROUND RULE TRIPLE

There are many ways for a batter to hit a ground-rule double.  he can:
1)  hit a ball in fair territory that bounces into the stands
2)  hit a ball that a fan touches in leaning over the rail
3)  hit a ball that deflects off any base into the stands
4)  hit a ball which deflects off a fielders glove, in fair territory, and bounces into the stands in foul territory

But is there any way a batter can hit a ground-rule triple?
Post #: 37
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 2:47:48 PM   
Guest
quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles K

As per my earlier post regarding the ball hitting the head and then going out, the ball hitting the fence before the head was key.  Conseco's was ruled a homer and the one referred to by Todd was ruled a ground rule double.

But the reason I disagreed with the ump's ruling when I read Todd's post and then responded, I thought the ump had more discretion on a ball leaving the bark, i.e., bouncing over the wall if the bounce is "deliberate".  But in thinking about this, the ump has discretion in awarding a baserunner an extra base, correct.  If there was a runner on first and had rounded second when the ball hit the fence, the runner of first could be put to third or given home plate depending on the umpire's decision.  The ump doesn't have to send the runner to third but can award the runner home plate since second base was already achieved when the ball hit the fence.  But the ump must give the batter a ground rule double in that situation.

Is this correct? 


Any player with the ability to direct a bounding ball out of the park off his head should.
1)  Be given the benefit of the doubt by the umpires on athletic ability alone.
2)  Benched by his manager for attempting such a "bone-headed" play.


In High School, we had a real good football player (tough as nails) go back on a fly ball and reach up and catch it barehanded.  He forgot which hand his glove was on....I kid you not....tough SOB but dumb as a rock.

Not the same as the Kevin Williams (I think that's who did it) one handed catch because Williams got better range by using his right hand than his gloved left hand as he raced over to the left field foul line but He too might have forgotten which hand his glove was on....never thought he was the brightest bulb in the batch.
  Post #: 38
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 3:17:17 PM   
djskillz


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From: Nashville, TN
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

THE GROUND RULE TRIPLE

There are many ways for a batter to hit a ground-rule double.  he can:
1)  hit a ball in fair territory that bounces into the stands
2)  hit a ball that a fan touches in leaning over the rail
3)  hit a ball that deflects off any base into the stands
4)  hit a ball which deflects off a fielders glove, in fair territory, and bounces into the stands in foul territory

But is there any way a batter can hit a ground-rule triple?


I believe yes, if he has reached a certain distance around the baseballs (I think just past 2b) and the ball becomes stuck in an area like underneath the fence, or in the ivy at Wrigley, etc., they can award him 3b and a ground rule triple.  I believe the same can be awarded for a HR, depending on his distance around the bases.

_____________________________

"People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
Post #: 39
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 3:18:13 PM   
Brian Olson

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

THE GROUND RULE TRIPLE

There are many ways for a batter to hit a ground-rule double.  he can:
1)  hit a ball in fair territory that bounces into the stands
2)  hit a ball that a fan touches in leaning over the rail
3)  hit a ball that deflects off any base into the stands
4)  hit a ball which deflects off a fielders glove, in fair territory, and bounces into the stands in foul territory

But is there any way a batter can hit a ground-rule triple?


A player is awarded three bases if a fielder fields the ball with equipment other than his glove, such as a catcher using his mask or a fielder his hat.  You also get three bases if a player throws his glove at the ball.  But none of those are ground-rule triples.

So, I say no.
Post #: 40
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 3:22:07 PM   
Trekgeekscott


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

THE GROUND RULE TRIPLE

There are many ways for a batter to hit a ground-rule double.  he can:
1)  hit a ball in fair territory that bounces into the stands
2)  hit a ball that a fan touches in leaning over the rail
3)  hit a ball that deflects off any base into the stands
4)  hit a ball which deflects off a fielders glove, in fair territory, and bounces into the stands in foul territory

But is there any way a batter can hit a ground-rule triple?


I don't know about hitting into one but if a fielder throws his mitt at the ball, it is automatically supposed to be a ground rule triple.

_____________________________

"All things can be understood once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." Gallileo Gallilei
Post #: 41
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 4:34:28 PM   
Easy E

 

Posts: 10871
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quote:

ORIGINAL: Trekgeekscott

quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

THE GROUND RULE TRIPLE

There are many ways for a batter to hit a ground-rule double.  he can:
1)  hit a ball in fair territory that bounces into the stands
2)  hit a ball that a fan touches in leaning over the rail
3)  hit a ball that deflects off any base into the stands
4)  hit a ball which deflects off a fielders glove, in fair territory, and bounces into the stands in foul territory

But is there any way a batter can hit a ground-rule triple?


I don't know about hitting into one but if a fielder throws his mitt at the ball, it is automatically supposed to be a ground rule triple.


The answer is no, a batter cannot hit a ground-rule triple.

They can be awarded 3 bases if a fan interfiers with a ball and an ump feels the batter could have reached third. And as pointed out, if a fielder throws his mitt, uses his cap or mask (any detached equipment, technically), to field a ball, also third can be awarded.

But those are awards, not ground rules.
Post #: 42
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/14/2008 6:31:17 PM   
Todd G


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ANSWER TO THE GROUND-RULE TRIPLE

Baseball doesn't have a ground-rule triple today, but it once did.  In the 1903 World Series between Pittsburgh and Boston, the Pirates, because of overflow crowds, permitted fans to stand behind a rope in the outfiled.  Both teams agreed that any batted balls that rolled under the rope would be called ground-rule triples.  In the four games played at Pittsburgh, the Red Sox collected 12 of the 17 ground-rule triples.  Tommy Leach of the Pirates hit a record four three-base hits in this World Series.
Post #: 43
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/26/2008 5:26:19 PM   
Todd G


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DISTRACTING THE BATTER
 
With Wade Boggs of the Red Sox at the plate, the Twins second baseman positions himself directly behind the second base bag and jumps up and down, waving his arms in a attempt to distract the Boston third baseman's focus.  Is this legal?
Post #: 44
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/26/2008 7:14:26 PM   
Matt Dahl


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

DISTRACTING THE BATTER
 
With Wade Boggs of the Red Sox at the plate, the Twins second baseman positions himself directly behind the second base bag and jumps up and down, waving his arms in a attempt to distract the Boston third baseman's focus.  Is this legal?

No way.

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M
Post #: 45
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/27/2008 12:09:54 PM   
Mark Cummings


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Matt Dahl

quote:

ORIGINAL: Todd Gray

DISTRACTING THE BATTER
 
With Wade Boggs of the Red Sox at the plate, the Twins second baseman positions himself directly behind the second base bag and jumps up and down, waving his arms in a attempt to distract the Boston third baseman's focus.  Is this legal?

No way.


Normally, this would not be legal.  But because the batter (Wade Boggs) was a tool, it is not only legal for the second baseman to distract him, it is also legal for the catcher to punch him in the gems during the windup 

_____________________________

Rooting for the Yankees is like going to a casino and cheering for the house. - Doug Stanhope
Post #: 46
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/27/2008 7:10:41 PM   
Todd G


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ANSWER TO "DISTRACTING THE BATTER"
 
No, but it used to be, before Eddie Stanky of the New York Giants brought undue attention to the play in the early 1950s.  Today, the umpire would stop play and warn the violator that if he continued to try to distract the batter, he would be ejected from the game.

The Twins tried a similar tactic on Boggs, when he was on a hitting streak in the mid-1980s.  Second baseman Phil Lombardozzi (I'm directly quoting the book here, Phil must be Steve's evil twin brother.  You know, the one that got in the fight with Phil Gladden) and short-stop Phil Gagne (see previous comment, was this the pro wrestler or the North Star?) changed positions just as the pitcher delivered the ball to the plate.  Umpire Ed Brinkman (a-hole) stopped play and applied Rule 4.06 , illegal distraction.  On the next pitch, Boggs hit a line-drive double (his only career extra base hit).

< Message edited by Todd Gray -- 2/27/2008 7:11:58 PM >
Post #: 47
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/27/2008 7:11:11 PM   
Todd G


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Dup
Post #: 48
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/28/2008 12:13:57 AM   
So.Mn.Fan


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Kudos, Mark and Todd.
Two of the funniest (?) posts I've read in quite some time.
I'm rather proud that this site continues to see an increase in smart-ass posts every day.
Seriously, a day without sarcasm in my life is a day wasted.
Thanks for picking up the slack while I 'm sleeping, fellas.  Carry on!
Post #: 49
RE: Baseball Trivia - 2/28/2008 12:23:02 AM   
So.Mn.Fan


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And btw, is that true, you cannot distract a batter?
You've got to be f-ing kidding me.
I cannot STAND sports who take themselves that seriously.
The whole "be quiet when Tiger tees off or putts" BS drives me insane.
Ball up, big fella. If you can't do your sport while 12thousand drunk idiots are screaming your name, you're a puss.
Seriously, soccer has riots in the stands, basketball allows government overthrows under the basket during free throws, hockey crowds raise the roof during shoot-outs, but weiners like Roger Federer and Tiger Woods must have intense quiet.
Screw that. I'd pay good money to see Rodney Dangerfield or Joe Flaherty follow Tiger around and air-horn him on every bunker shot. Now THAT'd be good TV.  
Post #: 50
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