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RE:Police Blotter

 
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RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 3:08:00 PM   
Lynn G.


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I told you before John, I don't think the difference was race. I think the difference was likeability. Right or wrong, it's a lot easier to throw stones at the jerk than the nice family man.
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RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 3:53:15 PM   
Steven JL

 

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[quote="John Childress"]The persecution of Barry Bonds is way out of control and again shows the incredible double standard in this country. The government is going to spend millions of dollars going after him for something as trivial as perjury while thousands of murders go unsolved with no attention paid to them. Funny, they sure didn't go after McGwire, MR STEROID, like this. And people try and claim there is no racism left in this country.[/quote] JC, Who claims there is "no racism left in this country"? Just curious because I have never seen such a blanket claim made by anyone. Looks like we need a strawman emoticon. Frankly, I'm surprised you would trot out the devisive argument that Bonds "per"secution is about race. You've never struck me as someone to buy into the culture of victimhood. Maybe McGwire wasn't indicted because he didn't lie to federal investigators under oath or obstruct justice? Or maybe McGwire wasn't part of the Balco Lab investigation which this sprung from? Or maybe it IS because they did want to go after the most visible target they could make a case against. Though I suspect it is #1 or #2. At any rate Bonds is charged with lying under oath and obstruction of justice. They apparently have enough evidence of it to proceed to trial. He'll have the best defense team available and the most favorable jury pool one could imagine in SF. He's no victim. As far as race tainted indictments, I'm sure there's plenty of unjustly charged poor black men you can throw your passion behind - you might want to go to thejusticeproject.org. But Barry Bonds is an odd choice of a victim. And I'm sure it'll come as great relief to: Scooter Libby Mark Fuhrman Martha Stewart that you think the government shouldn't waste time and money "per"secuting people who commit perjury or obstruction of justice because there's a bunch of unsolved murders out there. Were you advocating similar outrage over the indictment and conviction of these three on nearly identical charges to those brought against Bonds? While we haven't elimianted racism from this world, I would argue in this case it isn't about the color of Barry's skin but the content of his character. And a jury trial will now determine if they can prove the case.
Post #: 52
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 4:16:00 PM   
John Childress


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Please They go after Barry Bonds with more fervor than they went after Osama bin Laden Same with OJ He is an idiot and should be in prison the rest of his life but we don't need "news updates" on his facial expression in a preliminary hearing.
Post #: 53
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 4:33:29 PM   
Lynn G.


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Would it do any good to list all of the caucasian people who have been prosecuted for crimes?
Post #: 54
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 4:46:42 PM   
Cheesehead Craig


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The thing is, this has been going on for what, 4 years and now he gets indicted? I wonder what has changed. Personally, I hope it comes out that he was clean and has done nothing wrong. What will the government and the media do then? Will they proclaim his innocence as vigorously and as often as they have condemmed him?
Post #: 55
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 5:08:04 PM   
Lynn G.


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I agree that the timing is a question mark Craig. Did it take that long to get enough people to testify that they feel they can make a solid case? I don't know. It'll be interesting to finally see what evidence is presented.
Post #: 56
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 6:00:21 PM   
Jeff Jesser


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[quote="Easy E"][quote="Jeff Jesser"]This ought to be good. I have nothing but a hunch but I would say that 75% of the league is on some type of banned substance. You can't get that big without help. Even 5 whey shakes a day with creatine can't get guys that big.[/quote] It's not going to be "good". We already know the NFL players use all sorts of perfomance enhancing drugs, we just don't care. Shawn Merriman is the rookie of the year, the hottest defensive star in the league, a roid freak, and no one cares. The Patriots best defensive player misses the season for taking em, comes back to help beat Manning, and no one cares. We only care about it if the media tells us its scandalous, and it's only scandalous if it's in baseball, and if it's an unlikeable home run hitter.[/quote] I said that because I fully expected to get nailed with 1000 posts of "how do you know, you aren't a doctor or in the lockeroom ect..."
Post #: 57
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 6:01:54 PM   
Trekgeekscott


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[quote="Steven JL"][quote="John Childress"]The persecution of Barry Bonds is way out of control and again shows the incredible double standard in this country. The government is going to spend millions of dollars going after him for something as trivial as perjury while thousands of murders go unsolved with no attention paid to them. Funny, they sure didn't go after McGwire, MR STEROID, like this. And people try and claim there is no racism left in this country.[/quote] JC, Who claims there is "no racism left in this country"? Just curious because I have never seen such a blanket claim made by anyone. Looks like we need a strawman emoticon. Frankly, I'm surprised you would trot out the devisive argument that Bonds "per"secution is about race. You've never struck me as someone to buy into the culture of victimhood. Maybe McGwire wasn't indicted because he didn't lie to federal investigators under oath or obstruct justice? Or maybe McGwire wasn't part of the Balco Lab investigation which this sprung from? Or maybe it IS because they did want to go after the most visible target they could make a case against. Though I suspect it is #1 or #2. At any rate Bonds is charged with lying under oath and obstruction of justice. They apparently have enough evidence of it to proceed to trial. He'll have the best defense team available and the most favorable jury pool one could imagine in SF. He's no victim. As far as race tainted indictments, I'm sure there's plenty of unjustly charged poor black men you can throw your passion behind - you might want to go to thejusticeproject.org. But Barry Bonds is an odd choice of a victim. And I'm sure it'll come as great relief to: Scooter Libby Mark Fuhrman Martha Stewart that you think the government shouldn't waste time and money "per"secuting people who commit perjury or obstruction of justice because there's a bunch of unsolved murders out there. Were you advocating similar outrage over the indictment and conviction of these three on nearly identical charges to those brought against Bonds? While we haven't elimianted racism from this world, I would argue in this case it isn't about the color of Barry's skin but the content of his character. And a jury trial will now determine if they can prove the case.[/quote] I recall we also had a President of the United States impeached for Perjury and Obstruction... Simply put, if the guy lied under oath, just like anyone else...he deserves to be "pro"seccuted for it.
Post #: 58
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 6:12:31 PM   
Guest
I realize the Bonds case is much more serious than Libby's, so I'm sure Bush will either commute the sentence or pardon him.
  Post #: 59
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 6:21:01 PM   
Duane Sampson


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Matt Lehr Part of Steroid Investigation Thu Nov 15, 2007 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, citing the Dallas Morning News, reports that former Falcons OL Matt Lehr is among the names given to authorities as part of a steroid investigation. The Dallas Morning News cited sources familiar with the inquiry. Dallas-area trainer David Jacobs pleaded guilty to a federal charge of conspiring to distribute anabolic steroids this week. He claimed to have ties to the Falcons and Dallas Cowboys. Jacobs' attorney, Hank Hockeimer, Jr., of Philadelphia, would not confirm any of the names, citing a "cooperation agreement" that his client entered into with the government. Lehr, who currently plays for Tampa Bay and also played for Dallas, was suspended last season for four games while playing for the Falcons for violating the NFL steroid's policy. The Falcons cut Lehr on March 5 and he signed with Tampa Bay on April 3.
Post #: 60
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 10:18:20 PM   
John Childress


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quote:

CNN) -- CNN.com readers say Barry Bonds should face charges. But they also want to know where the feds were before Bonds packed baseball stadiums and crushed pitch after pitch to become baseball's home run king. Barry Bonds faces perjury and obstruction charges months after breaking Hank Aaron's home run record. Bonds faces charges he lied about his use of steroids to a grand jury investigating performance-enhancing drugs in professional sports. A federal grand jury in San Francisco, California, on Thursday indicted the seven-time National League Most Valuable Player on four counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice. The indictment comes more than three months after Bonds broke Hank Aaron's home run record set in 1974. CNN.com asked readers to share their thoughts on the charges against Bonds. Below is a selection of their responses, some of which have been edited for length and clarity: Jack Winters of Mesa, Arizona The feds are going after the wrong people. The owners and the baseball administration who have turned a blind eye to this situation since the beginning of the game where greenies, shakes, pills, etc. were given to provide "energy" for its workers (i.e., ballplayers) are the ones who are getting off free. It's a shame that the commissioner's office sits in silence when they have been complicit with the owners by omission for having never addressed these issues in the first place. Barry Bonds may be shamed, convicted (i.e., considering the known evidence, I hardly doubt a conviction is unanimously possible), never allowed into the Hall [of Fame], and possibly banned from baseball, but the commissioner and owners who carry the responsibility of the institution since they're the gatekeepers will have silently conducted themselves into absolution without ever being held accountable for the gross mismanagement of this crisis. Mark Lackey of New York It's about time. Now let's wait for a conviction. At least kids will see that if you cheat and then lie about it there is a price to pay. Should he play again? No way, and besides who is going hire him? Hall of Fame? Never. Give the record back to Aaron, who earned it like a man. A. Gibson of Plainville, Connecticut Two crimes committed here -- drug use by Bonds and the lawyers waiting for him to break the record and then charging him. It's funny if you think about it. Let Barry make San Francisco a ton of money and ... then after it's done let's send him to jail. I never liked Barry, but it seems he was used. Samantha Romaine of Santee, California The sports industry is big business, lots of pressure to be the best and produce results. If you have ever been in the locker room of a professional sports team, then you know it's chaotic back there. There are doctors and trainers all over the place, handing out things. I don't blame the players for being pawns in the bigger picture. I blame the big business for doing anything necessary to turn a profit. If you want it to be controlled and fair for all, then you have to follow the money. The players are just pawns in a much bigger picture. Stephanie Willis of Alpine, Alabama Why does the law care more about Barry Bonds' lie than the lies of the president? Which has hurt us more? Larry Boyer of Oakton, Virginia My hope here is that Barry can be come a great example for the children of America. This can happen in one of two ways. 1 -- He admits his mistakes and becomes a vocal advocate and champion again steroid use in sports or 2 -- He goes to trial, gets convicted and becomes a example of the tragedy of cheating and lying. I really hope he does the first, though that will take a major shift in attitude. But if he's really concerned about his legacy (and I think he is, which is why he continued to chase the record and allegedly lie) then he'll find the inner strength to admit what happened, his lies about it and even suggest that his record be removed or given an asterisk. This would be honorable. Terry Pixon of Lexington Park, Maryland Wow! This means that most of the league will be up for indictment, but I wont hold my breath on that. Hopefully if he is convicted the President will pardon him in the same manner he did Scooter Libby. Remember I wont hold my breath on that either. Michael Petry of West Chester, Pennsylvania This is a long time coming. It is a shame that the federal government had to step in because the commissioner of [Major League Baseball] has no guts to take such an action. This is typical of the commissioner anyway ... Theodore Tsaltas of Knoxville, Tennessee I'm a longtime baseball fan who stopped watching after the strike of 1994 and the ensuing drug problems. I'm also a physician. It is obvious Barry Bonds has been using steroids for years. In all baseball history, there has never been a player who had a home run frequency that increased after age 32, and never anything remotely like Bonds'. I am disgusted by the vogue of denying wrongdoing until it is proven, and disgusted by the unwillingness of baseball owners and players to take a strong stand against drug use. People forget that the notorious "Black Sox" of 1919 were actually acquitted of criminal charges, yet banned from baseball for life for their deleterious impact on the game. I wish we as a society, and players and owners as stewards of a great game, would act in the interests of that game. Jaime Delevere of Rock Island, Illinois Barry should have consulted with Martha Stewart. You don't lie to the feds. J. Hahn of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Finally. Sports has been almost as bad as Hollywood. It's about time it gets cleaned up. I hope both Bond and Michael Vick get what they deserve. Our young people look to athletes as role models. They need to know that actions have consequences. Brandon Farrar of Asheville, North Carolina I feel as though I have heard this story before. The continuous attack of African-American athletes. Do I think it is racist? No. However, I pose this question: If we are so concerned about the actions of these athletes, why are we focusing on the smaller picture at hand? Ruining Michael Vick's life over dogfighting will accomplish nothing. Dogfighting will still go on all over the country. Making Marion Jones admit she used steroids will do nothing because steroids will continue to be distributed amongst track athletes. Finally, finding out whether or not Barry Bonds lied about using steroids will do nothing because hundreds of other baseball athletes will use them in the future. Word of advice: If you want to really make headlines, do some work and shut down the people making the steroids and distributing them. Is this too much work? Or is it that you really don't care and would rather get the one person you truly dislike in baseball? Carlos Baez of Roswell, Georgia Barry Bonds indicted due to lying about steroid use? No way. What a huge surprise. I don't think anyone could have ever seen that coming. I mean, anyone can increase their hat size from 7 1/8 to 7 3/4 and their shoe size from 10 1/2 to 13 by doing scalp lift and toe curl exercises, right? Maurice Denney of Lebanon, Tennessee What a joke, a waste of taxpayer money. They should indict the commissioner and owners who knew this was going on with many players but didn't do anything about it. Since baseball popularity is back and their pockets are fat. Now you want to claim it is all about the morality of the game. What a joke
Post #: 61
RE:Police Blotter - 11/16/2007 11:17:14 PM   
Steven JL

 

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quote:

Stephanie Willis of Alpine, Alabama Why does the law care more about Barry Bonds' lie than the lies of the president? Which has hurt us more?
You mean THE Stephanie Willis of Alpine, Alabama? The brilliant political commentator, legal, and constitutional law expert? Yeah let's turn this into a politcal thread based on some random simpleton's flawed analogy. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
Post #: 62
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 12/31/2007 6:36:35 AM   
Duane Sampson


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Warren Moon Arrested Again
Sun Dec 30, 2007
 
The Seattle Times reports former Oilers/Vikings/Seahawks QB Warren Moon was arrested on suspicion of DUI and driving with a suspended license early Friday morning, according to the Medina Police Department. A Medina police officer spotted Moon's vehicle on the Highway 520 Bridge at about 2:10 a.m. Friday and noticed it had expired tabs, said Medina police Lt. Dan Yourkoski. Moon had a valid Texas driver's license, but his driving privileges have been revoked in Washington, Yourkoski said. Moon, 51, was arrested and taken to a Kirkland police station, where he was processed and released, Yourkoski said. A report will be sent to the King County Prosecutor's Office for possible charges, he said. In August, Moon pleaded guilty to negligent driving, a charge stemming from a DUI arrest in April. In that case Moon had been pulled over for DUI, but he tested below the legal limit for alcohol. A judge ordered Moon to perform 40 hours of community service and pay a $350 fine. Moon was a star quarterback for the Washington Huskies. He went on to play in the NFL for 17 seasons, mostly with the Houston Oilers, and also played for the Seahawks. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.
Post #: 63
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/11/2008 10:34:35 AM   
Duane Sampson


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POSTED 10:42 a.m. EDT, March 11, 2008
DWAYNE JARRETT ARRESTED FOR DWI
 
As a rookie, Panthers receiver Dwayne Jarrett was a bust.  And now he's been busted.
According to the web site of the Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Sheriff's Office, Jarrett was arrested on Tuesday for driving while impaired.
 
Widely expected to be a first-rounder out of USC, Jarrett was a second-round pick of the Panthers in 2007.  His arrival made Keyshawn Johnson expendable. 
Post #: 64
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/11/2008 11:13:04 AM   
Lynn G.


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Those who observe tyranny in silence are complicit.
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RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/11/2008 6:44:05 PM   
Guest
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RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/11/2008 9:46:29 PM   
djskillz


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Aww, so that was the problem...

He was PLAYING impaired all season!



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Post #: 67
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/13/2008 10:23:00 AM   
Duane Sampson


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Taylor details are revealed
Published Thursday, March 13, 2008 12:32 AM
http://www.tampabay.com/sports/football/nfl/article415067.ece

MIAMI — Sean Taylor's generosity may have led to a botched robbery at his Miami home last year, according to defendant interrogations released Wednesday.

Jason Mitchell, one of four men charged in the Redskin star's murder, told Miami-Dade detectives that Taylor gave wads of cash — $10,000 each — to Taylor's brother and sister. The siblings, Sasha and Jamal Johnson, flashed the cash in front of their friends during Sasha's September birthday party.

"I was just like, 'That's a lot of money,'" Mitchell said to police Nov. 30, four days after the killing.
Mitchell, 20, also told detectives that Taylor gave him $300 — "in all 50s" — for helping mow Taylor's lawn before the party.

Two months later, Taylor, 24, was shot in the groin during an attempted home-invasion robbery. The former University of Miami standout died the next day.

Charged along with Mitchell are Eric Rivera Jr., 17; Venjah Hunte, 20; and Charles Wardlow, 18, all of the Fort Myers area. They have pleaded not guilty. A fifth suspect, who is not in custody, has not been identified by police.

Prosecutors released sworn statements Wednesday from Mitchell, Rivera and Hunte, but a judge ordered the transcripts redacted in many places. In January, Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Dennis Murphy issued a gag order that prevents parties in the case from talking with the media.

Most of what's left in the statements deals with the times before and after Taylor's killing. All three suspects spoke to investigators after waiving their Miranda rights.

Among other details revealed in their statements:
•The men said they drove from Fort Myers to South Florida in a black rental sport utility vehicle, driven by Rivera.
•Only Mitchell had previously met Taylor, but the others knew he was a professional football player.
•Mitchell said he considered turning himself in after he learned of Taylor's death, but did not. He gave no reason. He also said the group almost ran out of gas on the way back to Fort Myers but scraped together $2 in change to make it home.
•Hunte said the men went to a friend's house after they returned to Fort Myers but did not talk about what happened in Miami-Dade. "We just sat. We just chilled, trying to get (expletive) out of our minds . …"
•Rivera said "all five of us" burned their clothing. When a detective asked for a reason, Rivera replied: "Nobody can find out who did it."
Post #: 68
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/15/2008 4:18:03 PM   
Lynn G.


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Packer player gets a good deal:

http://www.packersnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080312/GPG0101/80312149/1989

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Those who observe tyranny in silence are complicit.
Post #: 69
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/17/2008 8:06:28 AM   
ebergste

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Cheesehead Craig

The thing is, this has been going on for what, 4 years and now he gets indicted? I wonder what has changed. Personally, I hope it comes out that he was clean and has done nothing wrong. What will the government and the media do then? Will they proclaim his innocence as vigorously and as often as they have condemmed him?

That is always my question also.  With any of these guys who are "convicted" in the court of public opinion mainly by the media who blast it at you day and night how guilty they are and how they should just apologize.  What happens if they really are innocent? Will those same media people blast at you day and night how stupid they were and how they were way out of line or will it get the back page three sentence apology approach.   I get that the odds are most of them are guilty, but America is founded on guilty until proven innocent and John Q sportscaster/writer/radio host telling me how guilty a person is a thousand times doesn't make it true.
Post #: 70
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/17/2008 3:10:52 PM   
Easy E

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Duane Sampson

Warren Moon Arrested Again
Sun Dec 30, 2007
 
The Seattle Times reports former Oilers/Vikings/Seahawks QB Warren Moon was arrested on suspicion of DUI and driving with a suspended license early Friday morning, according to the Medina Police Department. A Medina police officer spotted Moon's vehicle on the Highway 520 Bridge at about 2:10 a.m. Friday and noticed it had expired tabs, said Medina police Lt. Dan Yourkoski. Moon had a valid Texas driver's license, but his driving privileges have been revoked in Washington, Yourkoski said. Moon, 51, was arrested and taken to a Kirkland police station, where he was processed and released, Yourkoski said. A report will be sent to the King County Prosecutor's Office for possible charges, he said. In August, Moon pleaded guilty to negligent driving, a charge stemming from a DUI arrest in April. In that case Moon had been pulled over for DUI, but he tested below the legal limit for alcohol. A judge ordered Moon to perform 40 hours of community service and pay a $350 fine. Moon was a star quarterback for the Washington Huskies. He went on to play in the NFL for 17 seasons, mostly with the Houston Oilers, and also played for the Seahawks. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.


He should be in jail. Why we let people like this continue to endanger us is just plain dumb.
Post #: 71
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/18/2008 10:26:07 AM   
Duane Sampson


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McKinnie enters his plea
By KEVIN SEIFERT, Star Tribune
Last update: March 18, 2008 - 12:38 AM

Vikings left tackle Bryant McKinnie pleaded not guilty Monday morning to all charges stemming from his Feb. 24 arrest outside a Miami nightclub.

McKinnie now faces an April 11 hearing in Miami-Dade (Fla.) County Court to determine whether the case will proceed to trial. He faces four charges, including felony battery, after police found him fighting with a member of the club's security detail.

"Bryant entered a not-guilty plea, and we are moving forward," said Larry Kerr, McKinnie's attorney.

The NFL is watching the case closely and will levy some form of discipline unless the case is dropped. McKinnie is a repeat offender of the league's personal conduct policy, which mandates fines and suspensions for players who are arrested more than once.

McKinnie has been arrested four times since joining the Vikings in 2002. Charges were dropped in two instances, and he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct in 2005.
Post #: 72
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/18/2008 1:55:21 PM   
Dave Odle


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Easy E

quote:

ORIGINAL: Duane Sampson

Warren Moon Arrested Again
Sun Dec 30, 2007
 
The Seattle Times reports former Oilers/Vikings/Seahawks QB Warren Moon was arrested on suspicion of DUI and driving with a suspended license early Friday morning, according to the Medina Police Department. A Medina police officer spotted Moon's vehicle on the Highway 520 Bridge at about 2:10 a.m. Friday and noticed it had expired tabs, said Medina police Lt. Dan Yourkoski. Moon had a valid Texas driver's license, but his driving privileges have been revoked in Washington, Yourkoski said. Moon, 51, was arrested and taken to a Kirkland police station, where he was processed and released, Yourkoski said. A report will be sent to the King County Prosecutor's Office for possible charges, he said. In August, Moon pleaded guilty to negligent driving, a charge stemming from a DUI arrest in April. In that case Moon had been pulled over for DUI, but he tested below the legal limit for alcohol. A judge ordered Moon to perform 40 hours of community service and pay a $350 fine. Moon was a star quarterback for the Washington Huskies. He went on to play in the NFL for 17 seasons, mostly with the Houston Oilers, and also played for the Seahawks. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.


He should be in jail. Why we let people like this continue to endanger us is just plain dumb.




This probably means I should change my avatar now, doesn't it? 
Post #: 73
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/18/2008 2:25:20 PM   
Easy E

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dave Odle

This probably means I should change my avatar now, doesn't it? 


Warren Moon used to be my favorite non-Viking player of all time. I can still tell you all the players on those old oilers teams, I had the #1 jersey, the whole bit. I practiced the "electric slide" in pickup games...

I even halfway bought the story when he was picked up for domestic battery the first time. It's amazing what kind of slimeball you can be, and that society will excuse, if you can play a game well. That's the danger in idolizing someone you don't know at all.
Post #: 74
RE: RE:Police Blotter - 3/18/2008 3:54:00 PM   
El Duderino


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The domestic battery thing turned out to be HER beating HIM, as I recall.  He cancelled her credit cards, and she flipped out on him.

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